The Week in Project 365 Photos [2009-W02]

You know what keeps me sane here in Houston? Not much. But I found something recently: the Project 365 group on Flickr. It's a simple concept: take one picture every day and post it to the group.

Your friendly neighborhood Twitter dealer

This morning, 33 prominent Twitter accounts were hacked, including our man Rick Sanchez from CNN. Kirk Kittell has the straight dope -- haha, rimshot, etc. -- on what transpired.

Image source: Ike Pigott.

44444


Posted on Flickr: 44444

A special moment between a boy and his horse or whatever.

Too heavy for Superman to lift

So: bummer.

Shuttle Overhead

Posted on Flickr: Shuttle Overhead

The Morning After: Snow in Houston

View from inside


Posted on Flickr: View from inside

OK, it's not much of a view, but here we go -- Salt Lake City, Utah to Grand Junction, Colorado.

Test: Illinois

Test: Illinois

Originally uploaded by kittell

Seeing if the mobile Flickr to blog bit works...

Wherein the Author Forgets His Keys and Walks 3 km in the Rain

Here are the facts.

Está lloviendo a cántaros en Houston -- cats and dogs, baby, cats and dogs;

It is a 1km walk each way to work;

I keep my USB drive attached to my key chain;

My apartment keys are on my key chain;

I used my USB drive at work today, i.e., I plugged it into the computer;

THEREFORE

I had a hilarious 3km walk in the rain after work today because someone -- I'm not pointing any fingers -- left their apartment keys dangling from their office computer.

What's Old is New Again

A few weeks ago, I discovered an archaeological relic while I was wandering in the wilderness. It was quite an expected sight. I had to stop and think a while to understand what its purpose was, to consider the role that it must have played in the lives of these ancient people. What were they doing? What were they thinking? Can we recreate these primitive folks from these few snatches of their lives? I respect the slow, steady work of archaeologists, and the challenges that they face in recreating historic puzzles with missing pieces and uncertain end states.

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